Risk Factors for Infectious Complications after Surgical Treatment of Spinal Metastases in Patients with Breast and Kidney Cancer

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Abstract

Relevance. In patients with the most common malignant new growth such as breast, kidney and lung cancer the rate of spinal metastases amounts to 70%. Increasing number of surgical procedures results in growing frequency of postoperative complications including surgical site infection (SSI) which do not only deteriorate the quality of patient’s life but change the timelines for renewal of therapy for the primary disease. Study design — case control study. Purpose of the study — to identify key risk factors as well as impact of tumor therapy on development of infectious complications in patients with breast and kidney cancer after surgical management of metastatic spine lesion. Materials and Methods. The authors collected and compiled the data on 2023 oncological patients who underwent specialized neuroorthopaedic treatment in the period from 2000 until 2017 due to tumor spine lesions. Inclusion criteria: malignant breast and kidney tumors with spine metastases, continued systemic tumor therapy, decompression and stabilization spine surgery irrespective of used implants. Patients that corresponded to inclusion criteria were divided into two groups. The first (main) group included patients (n = 22) with infectious complications after surgery. The second (control) group (n = 23) was formed by propensity score matching. Results. The analysis of obtained data resulted in identification of severe significant factors (р<0.05): diabetes mellitus, postoperative liquorrhea, certain classes by ASA (3, 4) and ECOG (2, 3, 4) scales, volume of blood loss, time of surgery and type of tumor therapy. However, the three latter have the highest statistical significance (р<0.01): surgical factors (blood loss volume and time of procedure) and type of tumor therapy. Conclusion. Postoperative SSI remains a common severe complication after surgeries due to metastatic spine lesions. The causes of postoperative infection after tumor resection are compromised immune status of the patient; long time of procedure with heavy blood loss and adjuvant tumor therapy.

About the authors

O. A. Smekalenkov

Vreden Russian Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics

Author for correspondence.
Email: drsmekalenkov@mail.ru
Oleg A. Smekalenkov — Cand. Sci. (Med.), Research Assistant, Scientific Department of Neuroorthopedics and Bone Tumors Russian Federation

D. A. Ptashnikov

Vreden Russian Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics

Email: fake@neicon.ru
Dmitry A. Ptashnikov — Dr. Sci. (Med.), Professor, the Head of Scientific Department of Neuroorthopedics and Bone Tumors Russian Federation

N. S. Zaborovskii

Vreden Russian Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics

Email: fake@neicon.ru
Nikita S. Zaborovskii — Cand. Sci. (Med.), Research, Scientific Department of Neuroorthopedics and Bone Tumors Russian Federation

D. A. Mikhaylov

Vreden Russian Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics

Email: fake@neicon.ru
Dmitry A. Mikhaylov — Cand. Sci. (Med.), Researcher, Scientific Department of Neuroorthopedics and Bone Tumors Russian Federation

S. V. Masevnin

Vreden Russian Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics

Email: fake@neicon.ru
Sergey V. Masevnin — Cand. Sci. (Med.), Research, Scientific Department of Neuroorthopedics and Bone Tumors Russian Federation

A. A. Denisov

Vreden Russian Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics

Email: fake@neicon.ru
Anton A. Denisov — PhD student Russian Federation

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