Antibacterial Activity of Antibiotic-Impregnated Bone Cement Based Coatings Against Microorganisms with Different Antibiotic Resistance Levels

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Abstract

Purpose — to evaluate the presence and duration of antibiotic activity of antibiotic-impregnated bone cement based coatings samples against antibiotic-sensitive and antibiotic-resistant microorganisms.

Material and Methods. Bone cement based coatings impregnated with antibiotics (gentamycin, vancomycin, colistin, meropenem, fosfomycin) are formed on titanium (Ti) plates. A plate rinse was carried out; antibiotic concentrations in the rinsed solutions were estimated by a serial broth microdilution method. Antibacterial activity of the control and rinsed samples against the antibiotic-sensitive and multiple-antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains was estimated by a bilayer agar method.

Results. The meropenem and fosfomycin concentrations in the rinsed solutions obtained at a one-fold (16 μg/ml for both antibiotics) and two-fold treatment (2 μg/ml for meropenem and 8 μg/ml for fosfomycin) were sufficient to suppress the growth of the control strains. One-fold rinse of samples with colistin eliminated their antibacterial activity completely. The marked activity of the samples with meropenem and fosfomycin persisted against the antibiotic-sensitive P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 strain after 2 rinse cycles; single-rinsed samples with fosfomycin also maintained the activity against the extensively antibioticresistant P. aeruginosa BP-150 strain. Vancomycin-containing samples possessed the sufficient antibacterial activity against both methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant (MRSA) S. aureus strains; two-fold rinse of the samples eliminated their bactericidal properties.

Conclusion. Bone cement based coatings impregnated with fosfomycin and meropenem possess the most marked and long-lasting antibacterial activity, manifested mainly against the antibiotic-sensitive strains. 

About the authors

D. V. Tapalski

Gomel State Medical University

Author for correspondence.
Email: tapalskiy@gsmu.by

Dmitry V. Tapalski — Cand. Sci. (Med.), associate professor, head of the Department of Microbiology, Virology and Immunology

Gomel

Belarus

P. A. Volotovski

Republican Scientific and Practical Centre for Traumatology and Orthopedics

Email: fake@neicon.ru

Pavel A Volotovski — researcher. Laboratory of Traumatology of Adult Age 

Minsk

Belarus

A. I. Kozlova

Gomel State Medical University

Email: fake@neicon.ru

Anna I. Kozlova — senior lecturer. Department of Microbiology, Virology and Immunology 

 

Gomel

Belarus

A. Sitnik

Republican Scientific and Practical Centre for Traumatology and Orthopedics

Email: fake@neicon.ru

Alexander A Sitnik — Cand. Sci. (Med.), head of the Laboratory of Traumatology of Adult Age 

Minsk

Belarus

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